Our pick of London’s 2020 exhibitions

POSTED: Friday, November 22, 2019

 

With just 40 days left of 2019, we’re already looking ahead to 2020 and the dates you should be putting in your diary. From David Hockney to Andy Warhol, there are some major exhibitions to keep you busy.

 

David Hockney: Drawing from Life

National Portrait Gallery

27 February – 28 June 2020

The first major exhibition devoted to David Hockney’s drawings in over 20 years will see the National Portrait Gallery explore Hockney as a draughtsman from the 1950s to the present. Featuring around 150 works from public and private collections across the world – including previously unseen works – the exhibition will focus on depictions of himself and a small group of sitters close to him. As well as portraits of his muse, Celia Birtwell, and his mother, Laura Hockney, there will be new coloured pencil drawings created in Paris in the early 1970s, composite Polaroid portraits from the 1980s, and a selection from an intense period of self-scrutiny during the 1980s when the artist created a self-portrait every day for two months.

 

057 Gregory Los Angeles March 31St 1982 Cp 055

David Hockney, Gregory. Los Angeles. March 31st 1982 © David Hockney. Photo Credit: Richard Schmidt

 

Andy Warhol

Tate Modern

12 March – 6 September 2020

Visitors to this Tate Modern major retrospective will follow Andy Warhol’s story from shy outsider to Pop art legend in what is expected to be one of the biggest events in next year’s art calendar. The first Warhol exhibition at Tate Modern for almost 20 years will offer a rare personal insight into how a shy gay man became the hub of New York’s social scene and his work marked a period of cultural transformation. Expect all his biggest works, including his Marilyn Monroe screen prints and Campbell’s Soup Cans, as well as 25 pieces from his Ladies and Gentleman series – portraits of black and Latinx drag queens and trans women – that will be shown for the first time in 30 years.

 

Andy Warhol Marilyn Diptych

Andy Warhol, Marilyn Diptych 1962. Tate © 2019 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Right Society (ARS), New York and DACS, London

Andy Warhol Self Portrait 

Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait 1986. Tate © 2019 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Right Society (ARS), New York and DACS, London

 

Alice: Down the Rabbit Hole

V&A

27 June 2020 – 10 January 2021

Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is one of the most iconic and loved books of all time, and its influence can still be seen throughout art, entertainment and fashion more than a century and a half after it was written. It’s not surprising that it’s inspired a major exhibition next summer at the V&A then. Following its curators down the rabbit hole, visitors will explore its story from its origin 157 years ago to its many reinventions across art, literature, film, ballet and fashion in what’s expected to be a mind-bending and colourful selection of multi-media displays.

 

Alice In Wonderland The Royal Ballet Zenaida Yanowsky Roh Johan Persson 2011 Costumes By Bob Crowley

Alice in Wonderland. The Royal Ballet. Zenaida Yanowsky ©ROH, Johan Persson, 2011. Costumes by Bob Crowley

 

The Credit Suisse Exhibition: Raphael

The National Gallery

3 October 2020 – 24 January 2021

In the year that marks the 500th anniversary of his death, The National Gallery will present one of the first-ever exhibitions to explore the career of Raphael – the painter, draughtsman, architect, archaeologist and poet. Although his brief career spans just two decades, his immortal legacy is celebrated across paintings and drawings, as well as in architecture, poetry, and design for sculpture, tapestry and prints. With loans from the Louvre, Vatican Museum, Uffizi Museum, National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Prado Museum, this impressive display highlights Raphael’s impact on Western culture and countless other artists.  

 

Raphael The Mond Crucifixion

Raphael, The Crucified Christ with the Virgin Mary, Saints and Angels (The Mond Crucifixion) © The National Gallery, London